Where did your love of fantasy begin? For some, it’s Harry Potter or Game of Thrones, or even Dungeons and Dragons. But for us true nerds out there, it was probably J.R.R. Tolkien’s epic masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings. Whether it was your gateway drug to the world of fantasy or not, it’s time to class up your hobbit hole with some engraved Alehorns. Why not try these Tolkienesque designs for Lord of the Rings engraving?

1. The Doors of Durin


It’s hard not to love this symbol. It’s so indicative, majestic, and perfect. Now, it may be too complex for an alehorn, but taking parts of it (such as the text, or the intertwining trees) could make for a beautiful series of horns.

2. Smaug by Tolkien


I’ve loved this symbol since I was a kid. There’s something so slinking and mysterious about it, and the fact that it’s done in the hand of the professor himself makes it all the more better. This has long been on my list of dream tattoos, but I’m sure a less painful option might be more appealing for some folks out there. If this design rings something in your memory, it could be because it’s very stylistically reminiscent of many Norse designs– Tolkien was obviously a huge Norse-a-boo.

3. The Ring Poem


Perhaps the most famous symbol in the Tolkien canon, this beautiful design would look perfectly sinister wrapped around an alehorn, or even just done in the traditional circle style on the front of a horn.

4. The White Tree of Gondor


The heraldry of the kingdom of Gondor is obviously elegant, mystical, and it is representative of the great peril of being Man. Isildur (famous anti-Ring destroyer) stole the fruit that became the White Tree of

5. The Edoras Horse


Granted, the design of this horse is more thanks to Peter Jackon’s films than the books, but I have been obsessed with this beautiful, flowy, horse mane since the early Aughts. If you have too, you clearly are a fellow member of the Rohirrim and you will need it on an engraved Alehorn. This horse’s unbridled, wild mane is a symbol of both loyalty and freedom for all Lord of the Rings fans.

6. A Leaf of Lorien


Got your own Fellowship you need to celebrate? Maybe a wedding party or just that group of really close friends who love to rewatch the whole trilogy all over again (and yes, we obviously mean the extended editions)? These cloak pins were given to the Fellowship of the Ring, after the loss of Gandalf, by the Lady Galadriel. They are a representation of hope, love, and goodness. As Aragorn said, “Not idly do the leaves of Lorien fall.” Which is a great representation for true fellowship– just like taking a pint or two of Green Dragon ale together in some custom Alehorns.