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Mead

  • How to Mull Your Mead

3 Ways to Mull Your Mead

2017-12-08T18:28:40+00:00 December 8th, 2017|Categories: Holidays, Mead, Seasonal, Uncategorized|

There are different ways to do it, but we're going to start with how to mull your mead using three different approaches. Mulled mead is one of the tastiest drinks of the autumn and winter seasons, and your AleHorn or tankard is the perfect device for holding it. Consider this: you've come home from a

So You Want to Brew Some Mead…

2017-11-18T18:59:47+00:00 November 18th, 2017|Categories: Homebrewing, Mead|

There's no better time than now to learn how to brew mead. It's cheap, it's easy, and in just a couple months, you will have a crap ton of alcohol that you, yourself made. My partner and I have been brewing for the past three years and it's a hobby that's brought us together and

Three Ways to Malomel

2017-07-18T12:48:52+00:00 June 15th, 2017|Categories: DiY, Food, Homebrewing, Mead, Uncategorized|

I have made a number of malomels in my day. In fact, they are possibly my number one favorite way to spice up any old mead recipe. Malomel Raspberry Mead via Robin Hill Gardens blog. If you are unfamiliar with the term malomel, it's simply a mead made like any other mead, but

Cauldrons and Horns: Brân’s Celtic Drinking Vessels

2017-02-27T18:25:57+00:00 February 25th, 2017|Categories: Beer and Wine, Drinking Horn, History, Mead, Uncategorized, Viking, Whiskey|

A burial in France from the Iron-Age housing a Celtic Princes belongings including an ornate cauldron. For many, especially in America, St. Paddy's Day is a day to let lose, get drunk, and get crazy. There's something of a negative stereotype to the Irish and drinking, but the tradition goes back way before

Norse Mythology Series: Mead of Poetry Finale

2017-02-15T17:46:15+00:00 September 30th, 2016|Categories: Beer and Wine, Drinking Horn, Food, History, Mead, Norse Mythology, Uncategorized, Viking|

When last we left our not-so heroes in Mead of Poetry, Odin the Allfather has disguised himself and indebted Suttung’s brother, Baugi, to him in order to get a chance at  Suttung’s mead, made from the blood of the first poet Kvasir by a pair of murderous dwarves. [Check out the first part of the

Norse Mythology Series: Mead of Poetry Part Two

2016-10-18T13:51:08+00:00 September 23rd, 2016|Categories: Beer and Wine, Drinking Horn, History, Mead, Norse Mythology, Uncategorized, Viking|

When last we left the Mead of Poetry, it was in the hands of the two murderous dwarfs, Galar and Fialar, who had made it with the blood of the first poet, Kvasir. The dwarves had become emboldened by their murder spree, and went on to attract the attention of the great giant, Suttung, after

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